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Curb appeal. The initial impression your home makes to the world. An essential aspect of your home's exterior for a number of reasons, not just if you're getting ready to sell and move.

There is something to be said about coming home to a welcoming view of your own personal "castle" and taking pride in knowing that you and your family live in a stunning house that exudes style.

Residential Siding Materials

Your home's siding can often make or break its curb appeal. Not only does it help define your house's style and character, it also acts as its first layer of protection against the weather, air pollution and pests of all shapes in sizes, including the two-legged human variety.

Whether you prefer contemporary vibes or a more traditional look, there are an excellent amount of options available these days to let you find just what you want.

Siding Choices Available Today

Horizontal Lap Siding

If you are looking for a more traditional style; horizontal lap is a universal option when looking at siding. It comes in a number of materials and is relatively straightforward to install. You can choose anything from aluminum or wood to vinyl or fiber cement. And, once you've made that decision, the sky is practically the limit when it comes to available colors.

Horizontal Lap Siding

 

Board and Batten Siding

Another good option for a more traditional look, board and batten is available in wood and fiber cement. Unlike the horizontal appearance of its lap siding cousin, board and batten provides a visual accent on the vertical axis.

Board and Batten Siding

 

Wood Strip Siding

Wood strips can be used both as a flat, horizontal or vertical siding. More traditional installations will utilize a tongue-and-groove configuration. For more contemporary look, it can be spaced apart with a protective layer behind it. In either case, its crucial to install a waterproof membrane behind it to protect your home from water damage.

Wood Strip Siding

 

Stucco Siding

Not just for Spanish or Southwest Style homes, this type of "siding" is available in natural or synthetic form. Stucco can be a fantastic choice for larger homes with more exterior area and straightforward shapes. The natural version has the ability to let air and humidity pass through it, reducing the possibility of moisture damage. When applied correctly, it can also have your color choice mixed directly into the materials, making your color last longer than traditional painting.

Stucco Siding

 

Brick Siding

If you are looking for a heavy-duty, low maintenance option, here you go. Used exclusively or paired with another siding option, brick siding is available in a large variety of colors, textures, and sizes that can be put together in a variety of patterns.

Whichever way you choose to use it, brick will bring a long-lasting and aesthetically pleasing look to your home that will endure for years to come.

Brick Siding

 

Stone Siding

Similar in durability to brick, stone is also relatively low maintenance. Also available in a vast range of sizes, textures, and colors, it is compatible with just about any look and style.

Stone Siding

 

Metal Siding

No longer just the go-to for Mobile Army Surgical Hospitals (anyone still watch M.A.S.H. reruns?) metal siding has made a considerable leap in contemporary architecture.

Durable and easy to maintain, you can choose from flat or corrugated copper, steel, and even aluminum. Once installed, spice up your look even more with the color of your choice.

Metal Siding

 

Like More Than One of These Options? No Worries! Just Use More Than One.

Just as there are a wide variety of different siding options available, there are also an even vaster array of siding combinations you can try.

You've probably seen many of the most common combinations such as:

  • Horizontal Lap with Board and Batten
  • Horizontal Lap with Brick or Stone
  • Board and Batten with Brick or Stone
  • Stucco with Horizontal

But, have you thought about Wood Strip with Metal accents? Or go really crazy with Stucco, wood Strip and Metal. Just make sure you consider what you are doing carefully. Once you've got it installed, it can be very costly to change your mind. Consider having a professional put together an illustration of what the final product will look like, colors and all. That way you can tweak the design and avoid a catastrophe you may be stuck with for a long time to come.

You will also need to check with your neighborhood Home Owners Association (HOA) to see if there are any restrictions you will need to consider when making your decision.

While all of this may seem a little daunting, in the long run, you'll be happy. Not just with the new look your home has, but with the satisfaction of knowing you've taken the step to make sure it lasts longer and continues to increase in value.