Address : 850 Main Street, Suite 4
Dalton, MA 01226
Contact Us : 413-281-0516
info@wellscustomframers.com
Office Hours: Monday to
Friday 7AM-6PM

Wood Framing Pro Tips

In the twenty odd years that we have been one of the leading wood framing contractors in Western Massachusetts, we've accumulated a fair number of wood framing tips and tricks. While there is no substitute for experience, we thought it might be helpful to share some of the things that we have learned over the years.

First, 10 Basic Tips

  1. When framing a roof, always use a ridge board. Not only does a ridge board help to keep the roof rafters in alignment, it also provides an extra layer of support.

  2. When framing a wall, always use a header. A header is a beam that spans the opening of a wall and provides support for the wall's load-bearing studs.

  3. Always use a level when framing walls and roofs. This will ensure that your walls and roofs are straight and stable.

  4. In order to avoid moisture damage, use proper roofing and flashing techniques when installing a roof. Make sure the roofing material is compatible with the type of roofing underlayment you are using.

  5. When installing trim, always use a level and a saw guide to ensure accurate cuts. This will help to avoid unsightly gaps between trim pieces.

  6. Always use a stud finder to locate the framing members in a wall before drilling or driving screws. This will help to avoid drilling into or driving screws into non-existent framing members.

  7. When installing cabinets or other heavy objects, use shims to create a level surface and prevent the object from sinking into the floor.

  8. Always use a sealant to weatherproof trim and other exposed wood surfaces. A good sealant will help to protect the wood from moisture and decay.

  9. In order to create a more secure connection, use galvanized nails or screws when framing with lumber that is treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA).

  10. When installing flashing on a roof, make sure that the flashing is fully sealed to the roofing material. Failure to do so can lead to water infiltration and roof damage.

 

Pro Tips

 

Slope Window Sills With Siding

Even if you apply all of the appropriate waterproofing best practices, water may still find its way in. Sloping the sill in the rough opening helps stray water to flow out again. Sloped siding is achieved by cutting the cripples at a small angle, which causes the sill to protrude somewhat on each side. Instead, rip down and install a tapered piece of weather-resistant siding. Lastly, measure the openings you want to frame, then make sure they're big enough to fit the width of the siding.

Use a Wane for Doubled Lumber

When you double up wood, such as when combining a jack and king stud, face the waned edges toward the middle. This will allow more meat on the edges for window, trim, or drywall fasteners.

Say Good Bye to Squeaky Wood

In order to avoid squeaky floors and walls, use construction adhesive to glue the subflooring or sheathing to the floor joists and wall studs.

Create a Tighter Fit for Doors and Windows

To improve the weather tightness of doors and windows, shim around the perimeter of the opening. This will create a tighter fit and help to keep out the weather.

Install a Second Header

When framing a large opening, such as a door or window, it may be necessary to install a second header. This will provide additional support for the wall's load-bearing studs.

Add a Crosspiece at the Top of Walls

Adding a crosspiece at the top of walls will add extra stability and help to keep the wall from bowing.

Use Trim to Conceal Gaps

Gaps between trim pieces can be unsightly, but they can be easily concealed by using a trim piece that is wide enough to cover the entire gap.

Install Sill flashing and Capillary Breaks

Sill flashing is a piece of metal or plastic that is installed on the bottom of a window or door opening. It helps to prevent water from seeping into the wall cavity. Capillary breaks are small channels that are cut into the framing around a window or door opening. They help to prevent moisture from wicking up the sides of the opening and into the wall cavity.

Use a Tie Plate over Studs

When installing a door or window, use a tie plate over the studs to provide extra support for the trim. A tie plate is a metal or plastic plate that is installed between the trim and the framing.

Use a Hurricane Brace for Porches and Decks

A hurricane brace is a heavy-duty brace that is designed to withstand high winds. It is installed between the top of the deck or porch floor and the bottom of the roof framing.

Use Metal Studs for Heavy Loads

When framing a wall that will carry a heavy load, such as a wall that will hold a television or a weight-bearing shelf, use a metal stud instead of wood. Metal studs are stronger and more durable than wood studs.

Install a Second Rim joist

When framing a large opening, such as a door or window, it may be necessary to install a second rim joist. This will provide additional support for the wall's load-bearing studs.

Add a Crosspiece at the Top of Walls

Adding a crosspiece at the top of walls will add extra stability and help to keep the wall from bowing.

Use a Mulch Patch

A mulch path on a muddy job site prevents dirt from entering the home. Mulch or woodchips are the cheapest options available. When the project is completed, everything will be graded into the yard. Make sure you purchase extra bags to “refreshen up” your pathway on a regular basis.

Stack Anchor Blocks

Instead of one brace, use two wall braces. You will be able to nail the brace higher and avoid splitting the end. A loose brace may be fatal; a few seconds' extra effort is worth the additional block. Always drive anchor blocks into floor joists and trusses.

Offset Blocks

When installing blocking on a wall always stagger them on each side of the line. This will help to keep the wall from bowing.